AJD Textbooks - YEAR 2


Appellate Advocacy

Appellate Advocacy

Taught by Greg Johnson

 

REQ7255/APPELLATE ADVOCACY Second-year students study a case pending before the United States Supreme Court, research selected issues, write an extensive appellate brief, and present oral arguments before a panel of judges. Classes focus on the appellate process, complex research and analysis, preparation of briefs, critical writing skills, and oral argument.


Estates

Estates

Taught by Stephanie Wilbanks

Professor Stephanie J. Willbanks is an expert in federal transfer taxation, income taxation, probate, intestacy, wills and trusts. The courses she has taught at Vermont Law School include Business Taxation, Estate and Gift Taxation, Estate Planning, Estates, Income Taxation, Tax Policy, and Torts. She is the author of "Federal Taxation of Wealth Transfers: Cases and Problems" as well as "Federal Estate and Gift Taxation: Quick Review."

FAM7710/ESTATES. This course examines the statutory and judicial rules governing the gratuitous transfer of property. This includes transfers by gift, intestate succession, wills, trusts, and other non-probate mechanisms. Topics include the nature of inheritance; statutes of descent and distribution (intestacy); wills formalities (execution, revocation, mental capacity, and undue influence); interpretation of wills; the protection of the family (spousal elective share, omitted spouse rules, and omitted children rules); the creation of trusts; rights of trust beneficiaries and their creditors; charitable trusts; modification and termination of trusts; fiduciary duties; powers of appointment; and future interests. Class discussion focuses on problems designed to explore statutory and judicial rules, policy and theory, and practical implications.


Evidence

Evidence

Evidence, taught by Deborah Young

Professor Young has taught at Cumberland School of Law since 1997. Previously, she taught at Emory University School of Law, served as an assistant U.S. attorney for the District of Columbia, and was a clerk to Judge Thomas A. Clark of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Eleventh Circuit. She is coauthor of Federal Sentencing Law and Practice (West Publishing) and an expert on Federal Rules of Evidence, criminal procedure, and trial advocacy. Professor Young earned her BA degree from the University of Kentucky and her JD degree from the University of Michigan Law School. This course surveys the Federal Rules of Evidence. Among important topics considered are relevance, prejudice, competency, hearsay, opinion, impeachment, and privilege. The course utilizes problems for discussion rather than cases. Students will have problems to complete for each class and a workbook to help master that material.